National Forum on the
Future of Liberal Education

201 Logan Hall

249 South 36th Street

Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6304

215-898-7425

Biographies

Sarah E. Igo

Co-Director

Sarah E. Igo is Associate Professor of History, with secondary affiliations in Sociology and Political Science at Vanderbilt University. She received her A.B. in Social Studies from Harvard University and her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University. Her primary research interests are in modern American cultural and intelletual history, the history of the human sciences, the sociology of knowledge, and the history of the public sphere. Her first book, The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public (Harvard University Press, 2007), explores the relationship between survey data--opinion polls, sex surveys, consumer research--and modern understandings of self and nation. An Editor's Choice selection of the New York Times and one of Slate's Best Books of 2007, The Averaged American was the winner of the President's Book Award of the Social Science History Association and the Cheiron Book Prize as well as a finalist for the C. Wright Mills Award of the American Sociological Association. Professor Igo is currently at work on a cultural history of modern privacy, examined through legal debates, artistic and architectural movements, technological innovations, professional codes, and shifting social norms.

Professor Igo has taught a wide range of courses in twentieth-century U.S. cultural and intellectual history at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Before joining Vanderbilt's faculty she taught for seven years at the University of Pennsylvania, where she was Associate Professor of History, a resident faculty fellow at Ware College House, and the recipient of the Richard S. Dunn Award for Distinguished Teaching.

Igo has held fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Study, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Whiting Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation. She has also been a visiting fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center at Yale and a Havens Center Visiting Scholar at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the recipient of the Early Career Award from the Journal for the History of Behavioral Sciences, and the Forum for the History of the Human Sciences and was named a "Top Young Historian" by the History News Network in 2007.

Igo has been a member of two ongoing collaborations, the Social Science Research Council Working Group on the Transformation of Public Research Universities and the National Young Faculty Leaders Forum at Harvard's Center for Business and Government. Igo currently servs as the co-chair of the Culture Network of the Social Science History Association as well as on the the boards of several journals and professional associations. She has also worked as a faculty consultant to the Advanced Placement United States History Program and the National Writing Board.


Peter Struck

Co-Director

Peter T. Struck is Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his A.B. at the University of Michigan and his M.A. (Divinity) and Ph.D. (Comparative Literature) from the University of Chicago. His primary research interests are in ancient sign systems, including theories of the sign in literary criticism, in divination and oracles, omens, and dreams, and in medical symptomology. His first book, Birth of the Symbol: Ancient Readers at the Limits of their Texts (Princeton University Press, 2004), explores how readers of Homer in antiquity found extraordinary insights in his epic poems--about the gods, the cosmos, and the human place in it. The book was awarded the American Philological Association's C.J. Goodwin Award, as outstanding book in classical studies. Struck is currently at work on a study of Greek and Roman divination, titled Divine Signs and Human Nature: An Intellectual History of Divination in Antiquity. He has published widely in professional journals on ancient philosophy, religion, magic, divination, and literary criticism.

Professor Struck has taught a variety of classes, at Penn, Ohio State, the University of Chicago, and Princeton, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. In 2004, he won Penn's Lindback Award, the university's highest award for teaching, and he won the Distinguished Teaching Award from Penn's College of General Studies in 2006.

He has been a member of several ongoing collaborations, including the National Young Faculty Leaders Forum at Harvard University's Center for Business and Government. Since 2003 he has worked as a consultant with the Teagle Foundation on national-level initiatives to promote the liberal arts. He has worked as a media consultant to NBC, Newsweek, U.S. News and World Report, A&E, and the History Channel. He is a founding member of the editorial advisory board of Lapham's Quarterly, a general interest publication devoted to history. At Penn, he has directed the Classical Studies Department's Post-Baccalaureate program, been Undergraduate Chair of Classical Studies, served as a faculty fellow in Hamilton and Stouffer College Houses, was topic director for the Penn Humanities Forum 10th anniversary program on "Change," and is currently director of Penn's Benjamin Franklin Scholars program and chair of the Integrated Studies Planning Committee.

Struck has held fellowships from the National Humanities Center, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Whiting Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the Center for Advanced Studies in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, where he is in residence during the 2009-2010 academic year.



Fellow

Orit Bashkin received her Ph.D. at Princeton University (1999-2004). Her dissertation "Intellectuals in Monarchic Iraq "1921-1941" looks at the construction of the Iraqi public sphere and the emergence of democratic discourses in Iraq during the interwar period. She did her undergraduate work at Tel Aviv University in Middle Eastern History & Arabic Literature. Her publications include articles on the history of Arab-Jews in Iraq, on Iraqi history and on Arabic literature. She has also edited a book Sculpturing Culture in Egypt with Israel Gershoni and Liat Kozma, which included translations into Hebrew of seminal works by Egyptian intellectuals. Her most recent book deals with intellectuals in Hashemite Iraq and is entitled The Other Iraq, Intellectuals, Pluralism and Culture in Hashemite Iraq, 1921-1958.


Elisabeth Camp

Fellow

Elisabeth Camp is an Assistant Professor in the Philosophy Department at the University of Pennsylvania, where she also has affiliations with the Institute for Research in Cognitive Science and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. She received her B.A. in English and Philosophy from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1993, and her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley in 2003. She then spent 3 years at the Harvard Society of Fellows before moving to Penn in 2006.

Camp works primarily in philosophy of mind and philosophy of language, with special focus on various forms of "non-propositional" thought and talk. One major strand of research focuses on metaphor as a cognitive and linguistic phenomenon. She is currently working on a book about perceptual and cognitive "perspectives," in which one concept or thought structures our overall understanding of a topic in an intuitive and holistic way. She has also written on sarcasm, fiction, and racial slurs; on the distinction between semantics and pragmatics; and on animal cognition and the difference between thinking with maps and with sentences. She regularly teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on mind, language, meaning, art, and the emotions.


Margot Canaday

Fellow

Margot Canaday is a legal and political historian who studies gender and sexuality in modern America. She holds a B.A. from the University of Iowa and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Canaday joined the History Department at Princeton University in 2008 after a three-year term in the Princeton Society of Fellows. Her first book, The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth Century America, was published in the summer of 2009 by Princeton University Press. It examines military, immigration, and welfare policy to ask how homosexuality came to be a meaningful category for the federal state over the early- to mid-twentieth century. The dissertation on which the book is based won the Lerner-Scott prize from the Organization of American Historians (OAH), as well as prizes from the Law and Society Association, and the University of Minnesota. She was also the recipient of the Louis Pelzer Memorial Award from the OAH. Canaday’s work has been supported by grants and fellowships from the OAH, the American Historical Association, the Center for the Study of Sexual Minorities in the Military, and twice by the Social Science Research Council. Her new book project is a queer history of the American workplace from the mid-nineteenth century to the present that integrates labor, business, legal, and women’s history with the history of sexuality.



Fellow

Jonathan Caverley's current research examines the distribution of the costs of security within democracies, and its contribution to military aggressiveness. He also studies the globalization of the defense industry, and the role of technology in international politics. He co-chairs the Working Group on Security Studies at the Roberta Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies.

His research has been supported by the Crown Family Middle East Research Fund at the Buffett Center, International Security Program at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University; the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation; and the Program in International Security Policy, University of Chicago.

Professor Caverley previously served as a submarine officer in the U.S. Navy and as an Assistant Professor of Naval Science at Northwestern University, where he taught undergraduate classes in Naval Engineering and in Leadership and Management. He has consulted for the RAND Corporation, where he helped develop scenarios for responding to a biological weapons attack in East Asia.

His Ph.D. and M.P.P. are from the University of Chicago, and he received his A.B. in History and Literature from Harvard College. He is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations and serves on the Faculty Advisory Board for the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative.


Angela Duckworth

Fellow

Angela Lee Duckworth is an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. Angela studies non-IQ competencies that predict success both academically and professionally. Her research populations have included West Point cadets, National Spelling Bee finalists, novice teachers, salespeople, and students. Angela received a BA in Neurobiology from Harvard in 1992 and, as a Marshall Scholar, a Masters in Neuroscience from Oxford. She completed her PhD in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to her career in research, Angela founded a non-profit summer school for low-income children that won the Better Government Award for the state of Massachusetts and was profiled as a Harvard Kennedy School case study. Angela has also been a McKinsey management consultant and, for four years, a math teacher in the public schools of San Francisco, Philadelphia, and New York City.


Dan Edelstein

Fellow

Dan Edelstein is an assistant professor of French at Stanford University. He was raised in Geneva, Switzerland, where he attended university, before returning to the United States for graduate studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He works primarily on eighteenth-century French literature, politics, and philosophy, and more generally on questions of political mythology and revolution. His first book, The Terror of Natural Right: Republicanism, the Cult of Nature, and the French Revolution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009), examines how liberal natural right theories, classical republicanism, and the myth of the golden age became fused in eighteenth-century political culture, only to emerge as a violent ideology during the Terror. A second book on the genealogy of the Enlightenment, also with Chicago, is forthcoming in fall 2010.


Zachary First

Fellow

Zachary First is the Managing Director of the Drucker Institute. The Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University is a think tank and action tank whose purpose is to stimulate effective management and ethical leadership across all sectors of society. It does this, in large part, by advancing the ideas and ideals of Peter F. Drucker, the father of modern management.

The Institute acts as a hub for a worldwide network of Drucker Societies: volunteer-driven organizations that are using Drucker’s teachings to bring about positive change in their local communities. In addition, the Institute maintains a digital archive of Drucker’s papers; undertakes research that builds on Drucker’s writings; offers an annual $100,000 prize for nonprofit innovation; produces curricular material that distills Drucker’s decades of leading-edge thinking, including through an engaging, do-it-yourself workshop-in-a-box called “Drucker Unpacked”; applies Drucker’s work to current events (through a regular online column in Business Week and through a social media tool called Drucker Apps); and hosts visiting fellows with Drucker-like insights and values.

Zach joined the Drucker Institute in 2007 after a 10-year career in higher education. He worked most recently as the inaugural assistant dean at Olin College, a new undergraduate engineering institution founded with a $430 million gift from the F. W. Olin Foundation, where he led the invention and implementation of the judicial and residence life systems. Zach received his B.A. in philosophy from Haverford College, and his masters and doctorate degrees in higher education from Harvard University. His doctoral dissertation research focused on the connection between leadership tactics and organizational performance. He recently completed a two-year study of innovation and assessment in higher education that was funded by the Spencer Foundation.


Brett Gadsden

Fellow

Brett Gadsden is Assistant Professor of African American Studies at Emory University. He received his Ph.D in History from Northwestern University. His research focuses on the modern Civil Rights Movement, US race relations, post-World War II America, legal history, and education history.

His book, Victory Without Triumph: School Desegregation in Delaware, is under contract with the University of Pennsylvania Press. This project explores the evolution of a long litigation campaign that challenged varying forms of racial segregation and inequality in post-World War II America and melded essentials elements of liberal integrationism with other traditions within the black freedom struggle, including self-help, voluntarism, and community control politics. State officials, responding in large part to widespread popular opposition to desegregation, opposed such efforts at almost every turn. This reaction revealed the power of an oppositional politics steeped in the ostensibly liberal language and logic of “whites’ rights” and provided a discursive bridge for a broad-based oppositional politics composed of interests nominally considered “Southern” and “Northern” and liberal and conservative. Civil rights advances and educational reforms were thus refigured as infringing on the political, economic, and social rights of white citizens. The depths of white opposition to school desegregation revealed the limits of the civil rights consensus around Brown v. Board of Education and the Civil Rights Act of 1964. As the burdens of reform were transferred onto African Americans, school desegregation in Delaware was, as the title of this book suggests, a victory without triumph.

Portions of Victory Without Triumph have been published in the Journal of African American History and will appear in the Journal of Urban History. Gadsden is the recipient of fellowships and grants from the National Academy of Education, Spencer Foundation, Smithsonian Institution, American Historical Association, Hagley Museum and Library, and Delaware Heritage Commission.



Fellow

Bryan Garsten is Professor of Political Science at Yale University, where he teaches and writes about the history of political thought and contemporary political theory. His first book, Saving Persuasion, a Defense of Rhetoric and Judgment (Harvard University Press, 2006), explored the history of thinking about political rhetoric and defended a model of deliberation in which rhetorical appeals play an important role. He is now finishing a second book, The Heart of a Heartless World, which explores the sorts of citizenship and religiosity that early nineteenth-century writers in France and America thought would fit most easily into life under liberal representative governments.

Garsten’s scholarship has won numerous awards, including the First Book Prize from the political theory section of the American Political Science Association, and his work in the classroom earned him Yale College’s Poorvu Family Award for Interdisciplinary Teaching. He is currently serving as Director of Undergraduate Studies for Yale’s program in Ethics, Politics & Economics and teaching courses on representative government, political rhetoric and ancient political thought. He has recently been involved in several projects to rethink the nature of liberal education both here in the United States and in other parts of the world.



Fellow

Leah Gordon is an Assistant Professor of Education and (by courtesy) of History at Stanford University. She received a B.A. in History from Brown University and a joint-Ph.D. in History and Education from the University of Pennsylvania. Professor Gordon is an intellectual and cultural historian whose scholarship integrates the history of American social thought, the history of American education, and African American history. She is interested in the social science of race relations, in school desegregation, and in shifting conceptions of social justice and equality in the twentieth century United States. More broadly, her research examines the politics of knowledge production, the relationship between expert and popular social theory, and the American tendency to "educationalize" social problems.

Professor Gordon's current book project, entitled The Question of Prejudice: Social Science, Education, and the Struggle to Define the Race Problem in Mid-Century America, 1935-1965, shows how individualistic social theories—which posited white attitudes, morality, and discrimination as the roots of racial oppression—gained traction in mid-century social thought. This study reveals how a particular framework for progress in race relations became dominant through an examination of networks: the social, institutional, and financial ties linking universities, philanthropic foundations, religious organizations, and civil rights activists. Debates about the causes and significance of prejudice at the Rockefeller Foundation, the University of Chicago, Fisk and Howard Universities, and the National Conference of Christians and Jews provide the source material and organizational structure for this analysis.

Professor Gordon has received awards and fellowships from the Spencer Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Africana Studies, and Cheiron, The International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences.



Fellow

Angel Harris is an Assistant Professor of sociology and African American Studies. He is a research associate in the Office of Population Research, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, and the Joint Doctoral Degree Program in Social Policy and Sociology at Princeton University. His research interests include social inequality, policy, and education. His work focuses on the social psychological determinants of the racial achievement gap. Specifically, he examines the factors that contribute to differences in academic investment among African Americans, Latino/as, Asian Americans, and Whites. He has published several articles on the racial achievement gap that have appeared in various academic journals such as Social Forces, Sociology of Education, Social Science Quarterly, the Annals of the American and Political Social Science, and Sex Roles. He has also published several book chapters and is currently completing a book manuscript on this subject for Harvard University Press. Dr. Harris is also in the process of writing a second book manuscript on the link between parenting and youths’ schooling outcomes.


Aishwary Kumar

Fellow

Aishwary Kumar is Assistant Professor of Modern History at Stanford University. He received his Masters degree from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, and his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge. He has held the Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Fellowship at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was elected the Rouse Ball Fellow in History in 2006. He moved to the Department of History at Stanford in 2007, where he is also attached to the Ethics in Society Program and the Program in Modern Thought and Literature. He is Faculty Associate at the Center for South Asian Studies at the University of Cambridge.

Kumar’s work is fundamentally concerned with the pasts and futures of universal history, as it has come to be mediated by the particularities of the postcolonial predicament. He is currently working on two books, provisionally titled The Death of the Early Modern: Primitive Record and the Labor of History and Touchabilities: Fraternity, Freedom and Measures of the Political. His publications are forthcoming in 2010 in Modern Intellectual History and Public Culture.

How does the concept of the human become universally thinkable? What gives the epistemology of the human such a recognizable legibility and conceptual consistency? The Death of the Early Modern argues that the human can be understood as having emerged as a category only through historical periodization, and that the death of periods, that is, of certain historical times, render this universality of the human and the legibility of history itself fragile. It interrogates the moment of archiving as the constitutive site where the human and the non-human decline and emerge as political and moral subjects in the modern imagination.

Touchabilities explores how notions of immediacy and distance in anti-colonial thought become crucial to meditating upon the founding assumptions of liberal politics and community. Much of the book is concerned with the conceptual life of touching and non-touching as it is displaced from aesthetics and logic and rehabilitated to the realm of the historical and the political. The experience of being touched or not-touched, the book suggests, comes to be inextricably tied to the experience of freedom itself as singular, fraternal and touchable. Understood thus, freedom is no longer containable within the calculable and reproducible world of the liberal contract.

Kumar teaches courses on South Asia; Liberalism and Violence; Empire; Disenchantment; Historicism and the Problem of the Present; Cosmopolitanism; Postcolonial Theory; and Universal History. His larger research interests are in the pasts and futures of democracy; the status of antiquity and civilization in modern thought; and the corpus of Indian composer RD Burman. In 2010, Kumar is organizing an international workshop at Stanford on “What is Civilization? Notes on the Indo-European”.



Fellow

Christopher P. Loss is a historian of the twentieth century United States who specializes in the history of American higher education. He is an Assistant Professor of Education at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. His work has been published in the Journal of American History, the Journal of Policy History, and the Journal of Military History, among others. His article “’The Most Wonderful Thing Has Happened To Me In The Army’: Psychology, Citizenship, and American Higher Education in World War II,” Journal of American History 92.3 (Dec. 2005), won the 2006 James Madison Prize, awarded annually to an outstanding article on the history of the federal government by the Society for History in the Federal Government. He has held fellowships at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia and at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C.

His first book, based on his dissertation, is under contract with Princeton University Press. Between Citizens and the State: The Politics of American Higher Education in the 20th Century is a synthetic social, political, and intellectual history that draws upon American political development theory, the history of citizenship, the new organizational history, and the history of the therapeutic ethos. It tracks the rise and fall of the partnership between the state and higher education in the twentieth century, revealing higher education’s central role in national politics, in state-building, and in ongoing debates about democratic citizenship.

Currently, Loss is beginning work on a number of new projects: one on the impact of war on the development of American higher education, another on the link between pluralism and diversity in campus and national politics since the 1960s. Loss’s next book will explore the rise of interdisciplinarity and the challenges it has posed for academic experts in the post-1945 U.S.



Fellow

Barry McCrea is assistant professor of Comparative Literature at Yale University, where he teaches modern literature, especially narrative, in English, French, Gaelic, Italian, and Spanish. His novel, The First Verse, won the 2006 Ferro-Grumley prize for fiction, and was published in Spanish and German translations.

His next book, World of Strangers: The New Families of Modern Fiction, forthcoming with Columbia University Press this year, investigates the relationship between new models of the family and new forms of narrative in the early twentieth century, and argues that the modernist narrative forms of Joyce and Proust are underpinned by a queer reconception of family ties.

His current book project, The Future of the Novel from Horseback to Facebook, argues that the semi-permanent electronic connectedness of our time poses a serious problem for the novel – not because readers’ attention spans are too short, but because the construction of plot, the rhythm of narrative, and the elaboration of character rely, structurally, on precisely what our technologies attempt to eliminate, namely delay and distance. Communications Technology and the Novel addresses the question of the novel’s future by looking at its past, analyzing the structural role that communication technologies – letters, horses, telegrams, trains, cars, email, mobile phones – have played in shaping plot and character throughout the novel’s history from the seventeenth century to the present.

He is also finishing an essay on minor-language modernist poetry by non-native speakers in Catholic Europe.

His research has focused on how deep narrative structures are connected to social, cultural and psychological realities, and he is interested in the challenges posed to the teaching of literature and to narrative form itself by recent changes in communication technology, reading patterns, and social life. In particular, he is interested in how the teaching of literature and the shape of the novel will evolve in response to these changes. The question of narrative form, which was central to literary study in the 1960s and 70s has since been sidelined by questions concerning content (such as identity or political contexts), but may now offer a way for the discipline of literature to address some pressing contemporary questions.



Fellow

Jal Mehta is Assistant Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His primary research interests are in understanding the relationship between knowledge and action; substantively he is most interested in the policy and politics of creating high quality schooling at scale. His dissertation, The Transformation of American Educational Policy, 1980-2001, recently received the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the AERA politics’ section. He is a co-author of Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings, which was a finalist for the C. Wright Mills Award. He is currently working on a book charting the growing “rationalization” of American schooling, asking what this shift means for the educational field, for the teaching profession, and for social justice. He is also working on a project, The Chastened Dream, about the limits and possibilities of using social science as a means of achieving social progress. He is also an editor and essay writer. Jal received his Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard University.


Cynthia Miller-Idriss

Fellow

Cynthia Miller-Idriss is Assistant Professor of International Education and Educational Sociology at New York University. She received an A.B. in Sociology and German Area Studies from Cornell University, and dual Masters in Sociology and Public Policy and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Michigan. Her overarching scholarly interest is in the relationship between national states, educational institutions, and citizens, with a primary focus on the ways in which state efforts to create certain kinds of citizens, or particular kinds of knowledge among citizens, become tempered, transformed, or even subverted by “everyday practices” in schools and universities.

She is the author of Blood and Culture: Youth, Right-Wing Extremism, and National Belonging in Contemporary Germany (Duke University Press, 2009), as well as several articles on youth, nationalism, and education. She has been the recipient of fellowships and grants from the Spencer Foundation, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the German Academic Exchange Service, and the U.S. Department of Education, among others. Her new work follows two main trajectories. The first project, which she is conducting together with Co-Principal Investigator Seteney Shami at the Social Science Research Council, focuses on internationalization in higher education in the U.S., Germany, and the U.K and will produce a book based on the first phase of qualitative data; it is currently titled Ambivalent Internationals: How American Social Scientists View the World (co-authored with Mitchell Stevens and Seteney Shami). The second project examines the recent escalation in the use of symbols and codes among right-wing extremist youth in Germany in the form of tattoos, slogans, t-shirts, and particular brands of clothing, sneakers, or music labels. Drawing on archival photographs and documents, Miller-Idriss is analyzing this symbolic performance of extremism and the decontextualization, reappropriation, commodification, and rapid transformation of right-wing extremist symbols over the past decade.

At NYU, Miller-Idriss currently teaches required methods and cross-cultural studies courses as well as doctoral seminars and will teach a new undergraduate course on terrorism, extremism and education in spring 2010.


Andrew Monson

Fellow

Andrew Monson received his Ph.D. in Ancient History from the Department of Classics at Stanford University in 2008. He also holds a B.A. in Classical Studies from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.Phil. in Archaeology from University College London. Since September 2008, Andrew has been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics at New York University. He is an affiliate of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at NYU. His research centers around the impact of Persian, Hellenistic, and Roman imperialism on Egyptian politics, society, and economy. He has published on land tenure, taxation, religious associations, and temple administration. His dissertation is now being turned into a book for Cambridge University Press with the tentative title, From the Ptolemies to the Romans: Land Rights, Taxation, and Political Change in Egypt.

One of Andrew’s broader interests is how Classics should respond to the globalizing trends in higher education. Students and scholars of the ancient world can draw on increasingly sophisticated cross-cultural, comparative approaches to understand parallel developments from China to the Mediterranean and from Central Asia to the New World. Andrew is co-organizing a conference with Walter Scheidel on fiscal regimes in pre-modern world history to be held at Stanford University in May 2010. The opening of NYU’s new liberal arts campus in the United Arab Emirates has afforded him an opportunity to explore how a global perspective on ancient history could create intellectual partnerships across contemporary cultures. He has organized Teaching the Ancient World, a two-day conference in Abu Dhabi and seminars for Emirati students in Al Ain, November 22-24, 2009, which will contribute to the planning for NYU Abu Dhabi’s undergraduate curriculum.


Margaret O'Mara

Fellow

Margaret O'Mara is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Washington. Specializing in twentieth century urban and political history, her research investigates the changing shape of postindustrial metropolitan landscapes and the experiences of the people who live in them. The modern university is central to this inquiry, having played an increasingly significant role in the economic, cultural, and political life of American places over the course of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. O’Mara’s first book, Cities of Knowledge: Cold War Science and the Search for the Next Silicon Valley, considered the role of universities in regional economic development between 1945 and 1970 and considered their influence on the form and function of high-tech landscapes. The university’s evolving role in the wider world continues to be a major theme in her current projects, which include a monograph about the changing definition of work and productive spaces in twentieth century America and a comparative study of suburban built environments in the US, China, and India.

In addition to her writing and teaching in the Department of History, O’Mara serves as a special advisor on university-based economic issues in the UW’s Office of External Affairs, steering partnerships with regional and national collaborators around sustainable urban growth, urban equity, and workforce preparation. She received her MA/PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and her BA from Northwestern University. From 1993 to 1997 she was a political appointee in the Clinton Administration, working on urban policy and health care issues as well as welfare reform.

O’Mara lives in Seattle with her husband and two daughters.

Web page



Fellow

Josipa Roksa is Assistant Professor of Sociology, with a courtesy appointment in the Curry School of Education, at the University of Virginia. She received her B.A., summa cum laude, in Psychology from Mount Holyoke College, and Ph.D. in Sociology from New York University (NYU). Her primary research interests are in social stratification and education. More specifically, her research aims to understand the transmission of advantage across generations, inequality in access, attainment and learning in higher education, and interaction between school and work. Roksa is currently conducting a number of different studies examining how young adults’ transitions into work, marriage and parenthood shape class and racial/ethnic inequalities in college completion and subsequent labor market outcomes. Her research has been published in journals such as Sociology of Education, Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, Teachers College Record, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Review of Higher Education, and Research in Higher Education.

Professor Roksa is also a co-author, with Professor Richard Arum at NYU, of a forthcoming book entitled Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses (University of Chicago Press, Fall 2010). Academically Adrift examines how individual experiences and institutional contexts are related to students’ development of critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing skills during the first two years of college. The research project that led to the book was organized by the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) as part of its collaborative partnership with the Pathways to College Network and is supported by the Carnegie, Ford, Lumina, and Teagle Foundations.

Professor Roksa teaches courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels in social stratification, education, research methods, and statistics. She has also worked on developing collaborative ties across disciplines and has co-taught a course with a colleague from the Curry School of Education titled “American Public Education: Successes and Challenges.” She was named a University Teaching Fellow (UTF) for the 2008-2009 academic year.


Vanessa Ryan

Fellow

Vanessa Ryan is Assistant Professor of English at Brown University, specializing in 19th-century British literature and culture. Ryan’s research and teaching explore the ways literary writing engages a range of other fields of thought, including psychology, moral philosophy, and history. She received her A.B. in Literature from Harvard University and her Ph.D. in English Literature from Yale University. Before starting her position at Brown, Ryan was a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows. She was most recently Research Forum Mellon Foundation Visiting Professor at The Courtauld Institute of Art, London. Ryan is working on a book entitled Thinking without Thinking in the Victorian Novel that examines the pivotal role played by fiction in mid-nineteenth-century debates about the new sciences of the mind. She has published articles on George Eliot, Thomas Carlyle, Arthur Hugh Clough, George Bernard Shaw, James Sully, and Edmund Burke in RES: Review of English Studies, Victorian Poetry, SHAW, The Journal of the History of Ideas, and Literature and Medicine.

Ryan’s work is concerned with how literary texts function outside the literary sphere, in social, scientific, and cultural settings. Specifically, she has studied the epistemological functions of literary form and its ties in the nineteenth century to moral action and education. Ryan is currently examining the conception of the intellectual during the later nineteenth-century, as literature engaged the growing importance of scientific and specialized knowledge. Her teaching centers on the nineteenth-century and also considers the relationship between scientific and literary writing more broadly. She teaches courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels on the Victorian novel, narrative and psychology, literature and technology, science and the body in art, and the fantastic mode in literature.


Lori Schuyler

Fellow

Lorraine (Lori) Gates Schuyler is the Chief of Staff in the Office of the President at the University of Richmond. At Richmond, Schuyler is responsible for projects that span the divisions of the University, and she advises the president on policy decisions. Working with the President and the Vice Presidents, she manages a wide variety of planning efforts, helps lead the institutional budget process, and coordinates the work on the University's strategic plan. Before moving to the University of Richmond, Schuyler served as Assistant Dean in the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Virginia, where she also taught in the history department.

Schuyler earned her doctorate in history from the University of Virginia, with a primary focus on twentieth-century southern history. Her first book, The Weight of Their Votes: Southern Women and Political Leverage in the 1920s, was published in 2006 by the University of North Carolina Press. That project focused on the effects of the Nineteenth Amendment in the South. In particular, The Weight of Their Votes explored the voter mobilization activities of black and white women in the South and the ways in which southern legislators responded to the policy demands of newly enfranchised women. The Weight of Their Votes was named an Honor Book for non-fiction by the 2007 Library of Virginia Literary Awards. That year The Weight of Their Votes was also awarded the Julia Cherry Spruill Prize for the best book in Southern women's history. Schuyler has presented her work in numerous public and scholarly forums, including the Virginia Festival of the Book and the Clinton School of Public Service Distinguished Lecture Series.

Schuyler received her B.A. in History from Yale University. She lives in Charlottesville, Virginia, with her husband and two sons.



Fellow

Mira Seo has been an assistant professor in Classical Studies and Comparative Literature at the University of Michigan since 2005. She specializes in poetry and literary criticism of the early empire, particularly the Flavian period (70-96 CE). After graduating with high honors from Swarthmore College in 1995, she completed a second BA in Greats at the University of Oxford in 1998. She received her Ph.D. in Classics from the Princeton University in 2004. Her work places literary analysis in the context of intellectual history; recent publications on Plautus, Statius, and Martial examine the discourse of money and commodification in Roman poetry. Her forthcoming book, The Character of Allusion: Reading Characterization in Latin Literature, reevaluates characterization in Roman poetry as a literary artifact of Roman approaches to the self. She has also been a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation fellow at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard, where she has been collaborating with Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Theirs will be the first English translation and commentary of the works of Juan Latino, a 16th century former slave, poet, and professor of Latin in Granada, Spain. Other publications treat works on antiquity in popular culture, including articles on Alias and HBO Rome.


Sarah Song

Fellow

Sarah Song is Assistant Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. She received an A.B. in Social Studies from Harvard University, an M.Phil in Politics from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University. Her research interests are in political and legal philosophy and the history of American political thought. Her book, Justice, Gender, and the Politics of Multiculturalism (Cambridge University Press, 2007), considers the relationship between theories of justice and theories of multiculturalism, and explores the tensions between group rights for religious and cultural minorities and women’s rights. The book was awarded the 2008 Ralph Bunche Award by the American Political Science Association. Her current work explores issues of sovereignty, migration, and the rights of noncitizens in liberal democratic states.

Professor Song has taught courses in contemporary political philosophy, the history of American political thought, and the ethics and law of citizenship and immigration. Before joining the Berkeley faculty, she taught for four years in the Political Science Department at M.I.T. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


Tracy Steffes

Fellow
h5>

Tracy Steffes is Assistant Professor of Education and Assistant Professor of History at Brown University. She received her B.A. in history and political science from Western Michigan University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in history from University of Chicago. Her primary research and teaching interests are in modern American history, including United States state-building, politics, and public policy; history of American education; legal and constitutional history; political and social thought; and rights, obligations, and citizenship.

Steffes is currently at work revising her dissertation for publication with University of Chicago Press, tentatively titled School, Society, and State: A New Education to Govern Modern America, 1890-1940. It analyzes the expansion and transformation of public education in the early twentieth century as a national state project. She has received fellowships from the Miller Center for Public Affairs, the Social Science Research Council Program on Philanthropy and the Non-Profit Sector, and the National Parent-Teachers Association as well as a Richard B. Salomon Faculty Research Award from Brown University.

Steffes has also worked on projects relating to history education. She worked with the National History Center on a study of the history major as part of undergraduate liberal education from 2006-2008, funded by the Teagle Foundation. She is currently working on a study of history teacher training in Rhode Island as part of a National History Education Clearinghouse project funded by the U.S. Department of Education.


Elise Temple

Fellow

Elise Temple is an assistant professor in the Department of Education and graduate faculty in the Department of Psychological and Brain sciences at Dartmouth College. Dr. Elise Temple's research focus is in the newly evolving field of educational neuroscience. This includes both an exploration of the development of neural mechanisms underlying cognitive and emotional processes and how these mechanisms undergo plasticity based on experience, education, disordered development or disease, and /or remediation. This overarching focus is being explored with a number of projects including 1) a newly developing program in neuro-math-ed, the exploration of brain mechanisms involved in mathematical processing - how they develop and are impacted by educational strategies, 2) normal and disordered literacy development and the effect of remediation and education, 3) the effects of stress and trauma on brain function and brain development, and 4) the development and plasticity of the brain mechanisms underlying theory of mind and the effects of culture and language on these brain mechanisms.

Dr. Temple received her BS in psychology and biology from the University of Oregon, where she worked with Michael Posner to explore the brain mechanisms important for quantity. She received her PhD in neurosciences from Stanford University Medical School where she worked with John Gabrieli studying the neural correlates of developmental dyslexia. She is currently at Dartmouth College in the Education Department where she is part of an effort to establish a new way of approaching education as a discipline. This effort has been termed Mind, Brain & Education and involves an evidence-based, multi-disciplinary approach to both teaching and research in education.



Fellow

Tiffiny Tung

Ph.D., Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 2004.
B.A., Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1995.

Tiffiny A. Tung is an anthropological bioarchaeologist who conducts research on the biocultural impact of archaic forms of imperialism on community health, social organization, and individual lived experience. To that end, she excavates and analyzes mummies and skeletons from archaeological contexts in the Peruvian Andes. Her ongoing studies have focused on how Wari imperial structures (AD 600 – 1000) affected, and were affected by, heartland and southern hinterland groups. She has published approximately 20 articles on Wari mortuary practices, disease rates, warfare and other violence-related trauma, migration patterns, and genetic profiles as viewed through ancient mtDNA. Her work also includes a bioarchaeological perspective on embodiment in which she examines the use and symbolic meaning of the body and body parts in elaborate Wari rituals. Her forthcoming book, The Bioarchaeology of Wari Imperialism, will be published by the University Press of Florida. In line with her interests on the biocultural effects of imperialism and colonialism, she is also investigating how Spanish colonialism impacted the health status and lifeways of indigenous populations in the Andes, and recursively, how Spanish colonial policies were altered by Andean cultural practices, ideologies, and expectations. Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Fulbright IIE, the Council on American Overseas Research Centers, and Vanderbilt University.

At Vanderbilt, Tung teaches a variety of classes ranging from a large introductory course on biological anthropology, to upper division lecture and laboratory courses, to an advanced graduate seminar, “Violence and Its Embodiments”. She also links her research and teaching by bringing 8 to 10 American students to Peru every summer to collaborate with Peruvian scholars and gain hands-on experience in skeletal analysis and data collection, enabling students to engage in the process of hypothesis testing and knowledge construction. Tung is also committed to public outreach and gives frequent public lectures in the U.S. and Peru; she has also worked with Discovery Channel and advises other media outlets on ways of disseminating bioarchaeological findings to the general public.

Webpage


Fred Turner

Fellow

Fred Turner is an Associate Professor of Communication at Stanford University. His research focuses on media and American cultural history, with an eye to the roles media technologies play in cultural change. He has written two books, From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network and the Rise of Digital Utopianism (Chicago, 2006) and Echoes of Combat: The Vietnam War in American Memory (Anchor/Doubleday 1996; 2nd ed. Minnesota, 2001). He has also written essays on topics ranging from the rise of reality crime television to the role of the Burning Man festival in contemporary new media industries.

Before coming to Stanford, Turner taught Communication at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also worked as a journalist for ten years. His writing has appeared in venues ranging from the Boston Sunday Globe Magazine to Nature.

He earned his Ph.D. in Communication from the University of California, San Diego, in 2002. He has also earned a B.A. in English and American Literature from Brown University and an M.A. in English from Columbia University.


Sarah Weiss

Fellow

Sarah Weiss is Associate Professor in the Department of Music at Yale University. She is affiliated with the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Department and serves on the Southeast Asia Studies Council, the South Asian Studies Council, and the Women’s Faculty Forum Council. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Music from University of Rochester and Eastman School of Music and an MA and Ph.D. in Musicology from New York University.

Working primarily in Asian performing arts, Weiss has addressed issues of gender, aesthetics, postcoloniality, and hybridity in both her writing and teaching. Her book, Listening to an Earlier Java: Aesthetics, Gender and the Music of Wayang in Central Java was published in 2006 by KITLV Press in Leiden. Weiss is now working on a comparative study of women as performers in five world religions. Entitled Ritual Soundings: Women, Religion and Music, the book will be published by the University of Illinois Press.

Her on-going projects include a comparative study of rasa in Indonesia and India; an investigation into the effects of hybridity on listening reception across cultures (Presented as the Yung Wing lecture at the Beida Campus, Peking University, April 2008); the theorizing of the ‘postcolonial’ in music; and a project with her grad students on affinity groups and choral communities, working with members of the dynamic Yale undergraduate a cappella world.

Professor Weiss has taught courses on: contemporary Asian theatre and music; analysis of world art musics; music ethnography; music and imperialism; gendering musical performance; postcoloniality and music; and Indonesian music performance and culture. She is director of the Yale Javanese ensemble, Gamelan Suprabanggo. Before joining Yale in 2005, she taught in the Departments of Music at the University of Sydney and the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and was a visiting professor in the Department of Music at Harvard University.

Weiss is currently a faculty fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center at Yale. She serves on the Council of the Society for Ethnomusicology and on the Board of the Society for Asian Music. She was on the faculty advisory committee for the Curriculum in Folklore at UNC-Chapel Hill, a member of the Academic Advisory Board for the University of Western Sydney, Department of Music, and a consultant for the Research Institute for Asia and Pacific Artists Program at the University of Sydney.


Martin West

Fellow

Martin West is an assistant professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, deputy director of the Program on Education Policy and Governance at Harvard’s Kennedy School. His research focuses on the politics of K-12 education policy in the United States and the effectiveness of alternative reform strategies in improving student achievement and non-cognitive skills. His most recent book (co-edited with Joshua Dunn), From Schoolhouse to Courthouse: The Judiciary’s Role in American Education (Brookings Institution Press), looks at the increase in court involvement in education policymaking over the past half-century. In ongoing projects he is examining the labor market for effective teachers, the effects of private school competition on student achievement across countries, and public perceptions of school quality. He currently teaches courses on the politics of American education, market-based education reform strategies, and program evaluation for education policy.

Marty received his B.A., summa cum laude, in History from Williams College in 1998 and his M.Phil. with Distinction in Economic and Social History from Oxford University in 2000. He completed his Ph.D. in Government and Social Policy at Harvard in 2006. Prior to joining the Harvard faculty, Marty taught at Brown University and was a research fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution. In addition to his academic work, he is an executive editor of Education Next, a journal of opinion and research on education policy, and a founding board member of Rhode Island Mayoral Academies.


Rashid Zia

Fellow

Rashid Zia Rashid Zia is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Engineering at Brown University. He is deeply interested in the role of science and engineering within a liberal education. He received his combined A.B./ Sc.B. in English & American Literature and Electrical Engineering from Brown University in 2001. He then went on to receive both his M.S. (2002) and Ph.D. (2006) in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University, where he was the first graduate student in the laboratory of Professor Mark L. Brongersma. His doctoral research focused of the physics of surface plasmon-polariton waveguides, and an invited review of his work on guided polariton optics was featured as the cover story for the July 2006 issue of Materials Today. Following postdoctoral research at the Universite de Bourgogne in Dijon, France, he joined the faculty at Brown University in 2006. Since joining Brown, he has collaborated with faculty in the humanities and social sciences in the context of advising, curricular development, and independent research.

Professor Zia’s recent research in the area of rare-earth phosphors and atomic optical frequency magnetism has resulted in invited talks at the 2008 Gordon Conference on Plasmonics, the 2009 March Meeting of the American Physical Society, and the Spring 2009 Meeting of the Materials Research Society. He was recently named as a recipient of a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on outstanding scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers. His current research is supported by a National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the Air Force Office of Sponsored Research (AFOSR) as well as a gift from the Nanoelectronic Research Initiative of the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC).

Co-Directors

Sarah E. Igo
Vanderbilt
University

Peter T. Struck
University of
Pennsylvania




Fellows

Orit Bashkin
University of
Chicago

Elisabeth Camp
University of
Pennsylvania

Margot Canaday
Princeton
University

Jonathan Caverley
Northwestern
University

Angela Duckworth
University of
Pennsylvania

Dan Edelstein
Stanford
University

Zachary First
Drucker
Institute

Brett Gadsden
Emory
University

Bryan Garsten
Yale
University

Leah Gordon
Stanford
University

Angel Harris
Princeton
University

Aishwary Kumar
Stanford
University

Christopher Loss
Vanderbilt
University

Barry McCrea
Yale
University

Jal Mehta
Harvard
University

Cynthia Miller-Idriss
New York
University

Andrew Monson
New York
University

Margaret O'Mara
University of
Washington

Josipa Roksa
University of
Virginia

Vanessa Ryan
Brown
University

Lori Schuyler
University of
Richmond

Mira Seo
University of
Michigan

Sarah Song
University of
California Berkeley

Tracy Steffes
Brown
University

Elise Temple
Dartmouth
University

Tiffiny Tung
Vanderbilt
University

Fred Turner
Stanford
University

Sarah Weiss
Yale
University

Martin West
Harvard
University

Rashid Zia
Brown
University